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Solid Chocolate

British Chocolate is often not given the admiration it deserves. This is possibly because of the recent 'Chocolate War' with France and other European countries who tried to ban British chocolate. However, it is the British we have to thank for producing the first solid chocolate.

The British company Fry, trading as J. S. Fry & Sons, is commonly given credit for making the first solid chocolate. Fry took cocoa powder, extracted cocoa butter and sugar and mixed them to produce the first solid chocolate in 1847. Fry's sold 'chocolat delicieux a manger' in 1847 and Cadbury Brothers, another British Chocolate manufacturer, were selling a similar product only two years later.

After producing the first ever edible chocoalte bar, Fry's expanded their production and began manufacturing the Chocolate Cream bar in 1866. In the decades that followed over 220 products were introduced, including, in 1914, the Fry's Turkish bar.

At the start of the First World War the company was the largest employer in Bristol. In 1919 they decided to merge with Cadbury's chocolate and the Fry's division was moved to Somerdale in 1923. In 1981 the name Fry's stopped being used at Somerdale, but the factory is still a significant manufacturer of Cadbury's products.

To this day Cadbury's continues to be a major producer of solid chocolate for the world market. With many of the products it has inherited from Fry's it maintains a significant place in the world of chocolate.


Fry's Chocolate
Fry's Chocolate
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